Hundreds Of Americans Witnessed Large Meteor Blast Through The Sky, Speed Likely Hit 47,000 MPH


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Hundreds of eyewitnesses reported seeing a fireball moving through the sky above New England on Sunday night, according to the American Meteor Society.

The American Meteor Society, a scientific organization that focuses on meteoric astronomy, received hundreds of individuals reports about the sighting.

The meteor was reportedly moving at a speed of 47,000 miles per hour through the sky and it was positioned 52 miles above the ground.

A NASA analysis indicated that the meteor was first spotted when it was moving above northern Vermont above the Mount Mansfield State Forest, before it traveled 33 miles and burned up above Vermont, according to a Facebook post.

“We hope to refine the trajectory as more reports and hopefully some videos filter in,” the NASA Meteor Watch Facebook post wrote. (RELATED: NASA Releases Perseverance Rover’s First Photo Of Mars)

Fireball over northern Vermont

Eyewitnesses in the NorthEast and Canada are reporting seeing a bright fireball this…

Posted by NASA Meteor Watch on Sunday, March 7, 2021

A camera at the Burlington International Airport was able to catch a sighting of the fireball as it traveled through the sky. The video showed the meteor as it moved through the sky.

For anyone who was wondering about the big boom / meteor earlier today in #btv #vermont , I dug through some webcam footage and found this on the WCAX / BTV Airport webcam- watch the upper left. pic.twitter.com/oyVLSoVahP

— Jeremy LaClair (@JeremyLaclair) March 8, 2021

There were exactly 110 reports from witnesses across seven different states in New England and in Quebec, Canada which detailed the location, direction, and brightness of the meteor observed at 5:38 pm on Sunday, along with personal remarks from the eyewitnesses based on their level of exposure to the meteor, according to the American Meteor Society webpage.

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