Wildlife Is Taking Over Cities As People Stay Home During Coronavirus


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As millions of people across the world are receding from public life and into their homes to slow the spread of the coronavirus, wildlife has emerged from their usual hideouts. People from India to Chile have spotted animals in usually busy streets. (RELATED: UK Experiences Their Deadliest Day From Coronavirus)

Here are some of the creatures that have taken advantage of the coronavirus lockdown:

In Chile’s capital Santiago, a puma was seen prowling on the streets during the city’s curfew.

Realizan operativo para capturar #puma suelto que se avistó en las calles de Providencia y Ñuñoa.

Revisa la nota completa https://t.co/vn3RdAbgeF pic.twitter.com/m2mxOhsDOY

— La Tercera Video (@LaTerceraTV) March 24, 2020

In North Wales, mountain goats have gathered in the streets and began munching at people’s hedges while everyone is inside due to the U.K.’s lockdown.

Goat update: they’re back, and they’re gathering in groups of more than 2 ???? pic.twitter.com/Bc2N42SPGo

— Andrew Stuart (@AndrewStuart) March 28, 2020

Mountain goats roam the streets of LLandudno on March 31, 2020 in Llandudno, Wales. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

Mountain goats roam the streets of LLandudno on March 31, 2020 in Llandudno, Wales. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

In Barcelona, wild boar from the hills are seen in the streets.

Diagonal con Balmes pic.twitter.com/xaD7IWmfnV

— Ana Raventós (@a2z75) March 19, 2020

This post circulated on Twitter, and the account posting it later issued a correction. The video does not feature the endangered Malabar civet, but rather the small Indian civet, which are not endangered and are native to South and Southeast Asia. In this video, the civet is seen in a Kerala street.

Spotted Malabar civet… A critically endangered mammal not seen until 1990 resurfaces for the first time in India during lockdown. pic.twitter.com/JX18O9r4zn

— Nature & Animals ???? (@AnimalsWorId) March 27, 2020

In Rushikulya, India, Olive Ridley turtles were seen nesting during the day for the first time in 7 years, Business Insider India reported. While they usually return to the coastline every year to lay eggs, the lack of fishing boats and foot traffic is likely the reason the turtles nested during the day.

The lockdown has now ensured no disturbances for the Olive Ridley Turtles #Odisha pic.twitter.com/ICj9xVJTwY

— Soumyajit Pattnaik (@soumyajitt) March 25, 2020

One of the world’s most visited tourist destinations, Paris, is abnormally quiet due to the lockdown. Ducks that normally can be seen at the Seine River can now be seen waddling around the Comédie Française.

VIDEO: ???????? As France continues its #coronavirus confinement, wildlife is claiming back some of the public space. Ducks are no longer content to stay near the Seine river, they now wander the quiet streets of Paris as on Friday evening near the Comédie Française theatre pic.twitter.com/gacaOvvcbK

— AFP news agency (@AFP) March 29, 2020

A Duclair duck stands on the banks of the river Seine in Paris on march 27, 2019. (LUDOVIC MARIN/AFP via Getty Images)

A Duclair duck stands on the banks of the river Seine in Paris on march 27, 2019. (LUDOVIC MARIN/AFP via Getty Images)

Deer from Japan’s Nara Park were caught on video wandering around the deserted streets nibbling on anything they could find

Less tourists in Nara = less people feeding the deer in the parks ???????? Now they’re venturing out into the city eating flowers and plants, per Fuji TV #coronavirus#新型コロナウイルス の影響で海外観光客の減少が続く奈良公園で、鹿せんべいをもらえなくなってしまったシカちゃん達 ???? pic.twitter.com/yUFWJ4S9sj

— Kurumi Mori (@rumireports) March 6, 2020

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